IRS FIRST TIME ABATE POLICY PROVIDES PENALTY RELIEF IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS

The IRS today clarified its policy with regard to abatement of certain penalties for first time offenders.  The policy was modified to clarify that relief applies only where the taxpayer is current with all tax filings and tax payments. See IRM 20.1.1.3.6.1.

WHAT IS FIRST TIME ABATE?

First Time Abate policy (FTA) is an IRS special relief policy that removes assessed penalties under the following general guidelines:

  • The relief is a one-time abatement.  There are no second chances at bat.  You get the relief once.
  • The relief applies to the following penalties:
    • Failure to file a required return under IRC §§ 6651(a) (1) (individual returns), 6698 (partnership returns) & 6699 (S Corp. returns).  This penalty is 5 percent for each month or portion of a month the failure to file continues up to a maximum of 25%
    • Failure to pay taxes assessed IRC §§ 6651(a) (2) & IRC 6651 (a) (3).  This penalty is 1/2 percent per month or part of a month that the failure to pay continues and also maxes out at 25%. 
    • Failure to deposit taxes which you are required to deposit under IRC § 6656.  This penalty ranges from 2 percent to 15 percent of the amount not timely deposited depending on how many days late is the deposit and whether IRS has notified you of the delinquency.

Thus, the penalties alone (putting interest aside) can grow to a very large and imposing amount.

  • To obtain the one-time relief for your first transgression you must:
      • Have filed all required returns or has filed or obtained a valid extension of time to file.
      • Have paid or made arrangements to pay (e.g., installment agreement) all tax currently due.
      • Have not previously been required to file or if returns were filed, had no penalties in the last three years (An estimated tax penalty will not disqualify you for FTA).
      • If multiple periods are involved (e.g., payroll tax quarterly returns), FTA will apply to the earliest period that meets the FTA criterion.
      •        For payroll taxes, the FTA applies to only one tax period.

WHEN IS FTA NEVER AVAILABLE?

The FTA relief is never available for some penalties such as those on event based late filed returns or unpaid tax such as for Form 706, U.S. Estate Tax Return, or Form 709, U.S. Gift (and Generation Skipping Transfer)Tax Return, or on Form 1120, or Form 1120S if returns were filed and a penalty assessed within the past three years.

Taxpayers who cannot establish “reasonable cause” for the delinquency should request First Time Abatement.  

FIRST SEEK “REASONABLE CAUSE” PENALTY WAIVER OR ABATEMENT

For penalties not eligible for FTA, IRS will consider whether the taxpayer has “reasonable cause” for the late filing, late payment or late deposit. IRS will base decisions on removing any future failure to file, failure to pay or failure to deposit penalties on any information taxpayers provide that meets “reasonable cause” criteria.

“Reasonable cause” abatements require proof but offer more advantageous relief than FTA. For FTA, you must have a clean record for three years. For “reasonable cause”  you aren’t limited by the three-year rule.  You qualify for abatement as often as “reasonable cause” is present, although habitual non-filers will find it hard to locate a good excuse.  If you’ve used “reasonable cause” to abate a penalty, you can still receive FTA in a subsequent year within the three-year look-back period.  Your record is deemed to be clean.   Thus, if facts merit, request a “reasonable cause” waiver or abatement before seeking a FTA.

To qualify for an abatement of penalties on grounds of “reasonable cause”, you must have an acceptable excuse.  The IRS generally will accept as “reasonable cause” excuses those instances when the non-filing or non-payment was not in your power to prevent. Some possible excuses that might establish “reasonable cause” are:

  • You lost your job without warning.
  • Your home was foreclosed
  • You were suffering, at the time, from a physical or mental health condition, including addiction, or alcoholism.
  • You were at the time severely depressed from, for example, the death of a loved one.
  • You divorced and, as a result, your income was suddenly and substantially reduced.

Taxpayers billed for penalty charges who feel they have “reasonable cause”, should send their explanations with their bill to their IRS Service Center or call the IRS at the telephone number indicated on the bill for assistance. Taxpayers may also use Form 843, Claim for Refund and Request for Abatement, to request a refund or abatement of the first time penalty or where “reasonable cause” exists for the late filing, late payment or failure to deposit.

 See IRM 20.1.5.6.1 dealing with penalty relief.

 © 2013 by Robert S. Steinberg, Esquire
All rights reserved

This entry was posted in COMPLIANCE, DELINQUENT RETURN, EMPLOYMENT TAXES, IRS COLLECTIONS, POLICY, RETURNS, TAX, TRUST FUND PENALTY, UNFILED RETURNS and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to IRS FIRST TIME ABATE POLICY PROVIDES PENALTY RELIEF IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS

  1. John says:

    So let’s say you had to turn in a 2008 tax return. What would the 3 year lookback period of compliance for a FTA be? Would it consist of years 2005, 2006, & 2007? Or since we are currently in 2013, would it consist of 2010, 2011, & 2012 (even though this is for a 2008 tax return)?

    • IRM 20.1.41.33.6.1 (5) contains the following example: Example:

      Taxpayer A files Form 944 for tax year 2010 and is assessed a FTD penalty (TC 186) on the MFT 14 account. For all years prior to tax year 2010, the taxpayer filed Form 941. The MFT 01 account for the 2nd quarter of 2009 (200906) has unreversed FTD, FTF, and FTP penalties; therefore, the taxpayer does not qualify for FTA relief on the MFT 14 account for 2010 (201012).

      At first blush this would seem to indicate it is the three years preceding the year for which the penalty is assessed. This update to the IRM, however, was made on 11/25/11 and reference to 2010 was likely used because 2010 was the last filing year. Logically, the look-back period should be the three years preceding the penalty assessment. Thus, in your example, three years perceding 2013 and not from 2008.

  2. bea clancy says:

    I had a tax debt twice. One paid off and now in a payment plan with another tax debt. Would I qualifyy to request a first time abatement on the previous taxes we paid of and we are in good standing with the IRS,and a request for penalty abatment for a reasonable cause for the 2012 tax year since my husband suffered a heart attsck and we both suffered physical and mental anguish ,pain, depression, etc. Due to declined and diminished health.

  3. This article is really helpful as I am looking for information about tax relief. I’m working on my tax forms right now here http://goo.gl/yN1wLk and it gave me the option to fill out the form neatly. Now my big question is, will I be granted for this request.

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